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Isle of Hope Market Update

Posted by seaport on February 9, 2018
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In this episode of Port Talk, Ben Bluemle is reporting from Isle of hope, one of the most exclusive and scenic neighborhoods in all of the Savannah market region. Located along the waterfront bluff, residents are attracted to the history and the beauty of the are. Locals can enjoy trips to the local marina, swimming in the community pool, and exploring the nearby Wormsloe Plantation. If you have any questions regarding Isle of hope, if you would like an updated list of available home, or if you are thinking of selling your home, please reach out to one of our agents today. See below for more information about life in Isle of Hope.

Market statistic in above video are from January 17th, 2018. For a current market update, email BenBluemle@SeaportRealEstate.com.

Postcard Worthy Neighborhood on Intercoastal Waterway

Isle of Hope is a small community just 8 miles from Downtown Savannah, sitting on a waterfront bluff where a mix of picturesque cottages and stately manors sit together side by side underneath historic oak trees draped in Spanish moss.  This tight knit community feels like walking back in time, somehow untouched by the technology and hurried rush of present day.

Greek Revival, Victorian, and Neoclassical manors share the bluff with Craftsman Bungalows and summer cottages. Many antebellum homes remain and have been passed down through generations. This unique mix of different style homes and the old with the new makes the Isle of Hope even more special, and reflects the sense of community found here.

Centuries of History

Early maps refer to Isle of Hope in French as L’Isle of Desperence.  Legends abound of pirates using the island to hide their booty, and generations of children have gone digging for this treasure. Legend also states that French Huguenots used the island as a place of refuge for fleeing persecution.

1732, King George II of England granted 500 acres on the island to Noble Jones, which was eventually named Wormsloe Plantation. Over time, Noble’s holdings expanded to more than 800 acres.  In 1973, Noble’s descendants donated all but the 50 acres surrounding the family home to the state of Georgia. But visitors are welcome at Wormsloe Historic Site, with a 1.5-mile drive canopied by 400 live oaks. Hiking trails lace the grounds’ lush maritime forest.

During the Yellow Fever epidemic that plagued Savannah in the 1800’s, Isle of hope was used to house those who were suffering. However, when visitors saw the beauty of the plantation, they began buying lots and building palatial summer retreats along the water. By the early 20th century, the area known as Isle of Hope had transformed into a yearlong residential paradise, or as some would say, a never-ending vacation.

Idyllic Lifestyle

Imagine a street lined with live oaks and storybook homes sitting on overlooking the Skidaway River. Children ride their bikes to the marina to grab ice cream while friendly neighbors walk their dogs along the bluff, and parents crab off the dock with their kids. Life in Isle of Hope truly is like living in a storybook, making it an exclusive and highly desired area to live.

Isle of Hope consists of less than 2,600 residents, comprised mostly of white collared professionals, retirees, and young families who embrace the safety and tranquility of the area.

 

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